The Hon Alan Tudge MP

Landscape Photo: 
Biography Text: 

Alan Tudge was elected to the Australian Parliament in 2010, representing the seat of Aston. Following the 2013 Federal election he was appointed to the role of Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister with a primary focus on Indigenous affairs.

He has been a member of the House of Representatives Employment and Education Committee and was Chairman of the Coalition’s Taskforce into Online Higher Education.

Prior to entering parliament, Alan spent most of his career in business, including several years with the Boston Consulting Group in Australia, Malaysia and New York, and running his own advisory business. He was also Senior Adviser to former Education Minister Brendan Nelson and Foreign Minister Alexander Downer.

He also spent several years as the Deputy Director of Noel Pearson’s Cape York Institute where he oversaw the design of the Welfare Reform program as well as a number of other initiatives. 

His experience with Cape York began in 2000 where he was the first corporate secondee into remote Indigenous Australia. Jawon which has now sent over 1000 secondees from Australia’s leading companies.

Alan has had a long term commitment to improving our education systems. As well as his work in parliament, Alan is a co-founder of Teach for Australia, a national non-profit which supports top graduates into disadvantaged schools.

He was born and educated in the eastern outskirts of Melbourne where his parents were new immigrants to Australia. His first jobs included apple and potato picking, factory laboring, bar work and sales assistant at Myer Dandenong.

He holds a Bachelor of Laws (Hons) and Bachelor of Arts from Melbourne University (where he was Student President) and an MBA from Harvard University.

He is a keen sportsman and proud North Melbourne supporter.

He lives in Wantirna South with his wife, Teri, and their two daughters.

Responsibilities: 

The Hon Alan Tudge MP is the Assistant Minister to the Prime Minister.

Creating an indigenous enterprise culture through government procurement

On Tuesday night, leaders of the corporate and indigenous community gathered at Darling Harbour for the Supply Nation Gala dinner which recognises indigenous entrepreneurship across the nation.

I wish the night could be attended by all Australians because it shows the extraordinary, but typically unheralded, work that indigenous business people have done in building businesses, creating wealth and employing others. The glamorous black-tie evening is the opposite of the negative images that are so frequently associated with indigenous people.

Sky News AM Agenda Interview with Kieran Gilbert

KIERAN GILBERT:
Alan Tudge on the same sex marriage issue, do you feel that there is a group within your party, momentum within your party towards marriage equality?

ALAN TUDGE:
I think some people have shifted but I don't know where the numbers sit. I think if a vote was taken it would be very close. But at the moment we're absolutely focused on getting the budget measures through the parliament. That's our unashamed focus at the moment.

ABC Melbourne Interview with Jon Faine

JON FAINE:
Mr Tudge, good morning to you.

ALAN TUDGE:
Good morning Jon. How are you going?

JON FAINE:
Is 'nervous backbencher' the appropriate description of you on same sex marriage reform?

ALAN TUDGE:
Technically I'm a frontbencher as a Parliamentary Secretary and I wouldn't say that I'm nervous.

JON FAINE:
Is it an issue that causes you any difficulties or anxiety? Have you made up your mind?

Sky News, Lunchtime Agenda Interview with David Lipson

DAVID LIPSON:
Thank you both for your time.  I want to look first of all to this ABS data that shows mining and non-mining investment is expected to be slashed by 21 per cent in the year ahead.    One UBS economist, Alan Tudge, says that the outlook has switched from bleak to recessionary.   Do you stand by the budget forecast of
2.75 per cent growth for the year ahead, and then 3.25 per cent the year after?

ABC RN Life Matters interview with Natasha Mitchell

NATASHA MITCHELL:
Good morning to you Alan.

ALAN TUDGE:
Good morning Natasha. Thanks for having me on the programme.

NATASHA MITCHELL:
And thank you for joining us in the Canberra studios.  Matthew Campbell is joining us too.  He's Research Co- ordinator at Tangentyere Council based in Alice Springs.  He's going to give us a sense of how the card has worked in communities he's studied. Welcome to you.

MATTHEW CAMPBELL:
Morning Natasha.

The case for recognition

Greg Sheridan provides a seductively simple argument why indigenous people should not be recognised in the constitution we are all equal citizens and no one should be recognised constitutionally because of their race or heritage. We must move beyond race and treat people as individuals. Sheridan's argument is based on important liberal principles, but he makes the incorrect assumption that any indigenous recognition will necessarily contravene them . The starting point for constitutional change is, in fact, to remove the two clauses that already do contravene liberal principles.

SKY News interview with Peter Van Onselen

PETER VAN ONSELEN:
We’re going to talk federation reform mostly but firstly, having one of the Prime Minister’s Parliamentary Secretaries here you’ve got to do me a favour – he won’t do an interview with me! I can’t get the Prime Minister to do an interview with me not for love nor money. You’ve got to wield some of that influence of yours.
ALAN TUDGE:
Is that right? I’ll do my best for you Peter.
PETER VAN ONSELEN:

SKY news Richo program - Interview with Graham Richardson

GRAHAM RICHARDSON:
Alan Tudge, Parliamentary Secretary to Tony Abbott and I think the Member for Aston.
ALAN TUDGE:
Correct.
GRAHAM RICHARDSON:
Which is a pretty safe liberal seat, is it not? I don’t think you have to worry too much about the Labor Party do you?
ALAN TUDGE:
Well no seat is super safe these days. You always have to work hard for your constituents and that’s what I intend to keep on doing.
GRAHAM RICHARDSON:

3AW Drive - Interview with Tom Elliott

TOM ELLIOTT:
Mr Tudge, good evening.

ALAN TUDGE:
G'day Tom, great to be with you.

TOM ELLIOTT:
Thank you for joining us.

I read a lot about on what should or shouldn't be done under our constitution but I'm yet to get a politician be able to say to me, look this is where we are heading, we do want to recognise indigenous people in the constitution, this is the way we are proposing to do it. Can you shed some light on the situation?

ALAN TUDGE:
I'll do my best Tom.

Pages