The Hon Alan Tudge MP

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Biography Text: 

Alan Tudge was elected to the Australian Parliament in 2010, representing the seat of Aston. Following the 2013 Federal election he was appointed to the role of Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister with a primary focus on Indigenous affairs.

He has been a member of the House of Representatives Employment and Education Committee and was Chairman of the Coalition’s Taskforce into Online Higher Education.

Prior to entering parliament, Alan spent most of his career in business, including several years with the Boston Consulting Group in Australia, Malaysia and New York, and running his own advisory business. He was also Senior Adviser to former Education Minister Brendan Nelson and Foreign Minister Alexander Downer.

He also spent several years as the Deputy Director of Noel Pearson’s Cape York Institute where he oversaw the design of the Welfare Reform program as well as a number of other initiatives. 

His experience with Cape York began in 2000 where he was the first corporate secondee into remote Indigenous Australia. Jawon which has now sent over 1000 secondees from Australia’s leading companies.

Alan has had a long term commitment to improving our education systems. As well as his work in parliament, Alan is a co-founder of Teach for Australia, a national non-profit which supports top graduates into disadvantaged schools.

He was born and educated in the eastern outskirts of Melbourne where his parents were new immigrants to Australia. His first jobs included apple and potato picking, factory laboring, bar work and sales assistant at Myer Dandenong.

He holds a Bachelor of Laws (Hons) and Bachelor of Arts from Melbourne University (where he was Student President) and an MBA from Harvard University.

He is a keen sportsman and proud North Melbourne supporter.

He lives in Wantirna South with his wife, Teri, and their two daughters.

Responsibilities: 

The Hon Alan Tudge MP is the Assistant Minister to the Prime Minister.

3AW Melbourne with Tom Elliott

Topics: cashless debit card

TOM ELLIOTT: Joining us on the line, the architect of cashless welfare, Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister, Alan Tudge, good evening.

ALAN TUDGE: G'day Tom.

TOM ELLIOTT: So you're about to launch the cashless welfare card in Ceduna. Is this just a trial or is this part of a bigger rollout?

ABC Capital Hill, Interview with Greg Jennett

GREG JENNETT:
Alan Tudge, we’re hearing a lot of good intentions today about the tone of the House. Will it last?

ALAN TUDGE:
I think it will. We’ve just elected Tony Smith to be the new Speaker. I think he’ll do an outstanding job. He’s a relatively young member at 47, he’s been in the parliament though for 14 years so he brings a lot of experience. I think he’s respected on both sides and I think he will bring a good discipline and a good tone to the parliament.

2GB Sydney Interview With Alan Jones

Topics: Centrelink debit card E&OE…

ALAN JONES:
Alan Tudge, good morning.

ALAN TUDGE:
Good morning Alan.

ALAN JONES:
Where are we on this cashless welfare debit card?

ALAN TUDGE:
The Government has made a decision that we want to trial this idea and we're going to do so in two or three locations across the country. We'll be introducing legislation next week to authorise these trials.

ALAN JONES:
Will the Senate pass that?

Solution to grog on the cards

What responsibility should we have over how welfare is delivered to those in need? Since the introduction of federal unemployment benefits in 1944, the government has provided welfare in cash. The reason is expedience: dropping cash into an account is simpler and cheaper than the traditional church welfare of providing clothes, food or vouchers.

But what happens if the cash is wasted on drugs, alcohol and gambling, leading to catastrophic social consequences?

Centrelink Cashless Debit Card Legislation introduced to Parliament

Today, I introduced legislation to authorise a trial of the Centrelink Cashless Debit Card into the House of Representatives.

The trial will operate in up to three trial sites, limited to 10,000 people and is aimed at reducing the welfare-fuelled alcohol, drug and gambling abuse that plagues some communities in Australia.

Under the trial, 80 per cent of a person's social security payments will be placed into a recipient's Centrelink debit card account. The remaining 20 per cent cash will be placed into a recipient's existing bank account.

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