The Hon Alan Tudge MP

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Biography Text: 

Alan Tudge was elected to the Australian Parliament in 2010, representing the seat of Aston. Following the 2013 Federal election he was appointed to the role of Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister with a primary focus on Indigenous affairs.

He has been a member of the House of Representatives Employment and Education Committee and was Chairman of the Coalition’s Taskforce into Online Higher Education.

Prior to entering parliament, Alan spent most of his career in business, including several years with the Boston Consulting Group in Australia, Malaysia and New York, and running his own advisory business. He was also Senior Adviser to former Education Minister Brendan Nelson and Foreign Minister Alexander Downer.

He also spent several years as the Deputy Director of Noel Pearson’s Cape York Institute where he oversaw the design of the Welfare Reform program as well as a number of other initiatives. 

His experience with Cape York began in 2000 where he was the first corporate secondee into remote Indigenous Australia. Jawon which has now sent over 1000 secondees from Australia’s leading companies.

Alan has had a long term commitment to improving our education systems. As well as his work in parliament, Alan is a co-founder of Teach for Australia, a national non-profit which supports top graduates into disadvantaged schools.

He was born and educated in the eastern outskirts of Melbourne where his parents were new immigrants to Australia. His first jobs included apple and potato picking, factory laboring, bar work and sales assistant at Myer Dandenong.

He holds a Bachelor of Laws (Hons) and Bachelor of Arts from Melbourne University (where he was Student President) and an MBA from Harvard University.

He is a keen sportsman and proud North Melbourne supporter.

He lives in Wantirna South with his wife, Teri, and their two daughters.

Responsibilities: 

The Hon Alan Tudge MP is the Assistant Minister to the Prime Minister.

Transcript - Doorstop Parliament House, Canberra

Topics: East West Link, Newspoll, Budget, Higher Education, Forrest Review

ALAN TUDGE:

Last year in August Daniel Andrews said 'sovereign risk is sovereign risk, a contract is a contract'. Well the most important contract that was signed by the former Coalition Government in Victoria was the East West Link contract and Daniel Andrews should honour that contract.

Chris Bowen also said 'Labor does not break contracts.' He said that because there are sovereign risk implications if you do break contracts from a former government.

Transcript - Doorstop Parliament House, Canberra

Topics: Victorian election, East West Link

ALAN TUDGE: Firstly I just want to congratulate Daniel Andrews on becoming Premier of Victoria. It's obviously a disappointing result for the Coalition and we'll learn the lessons from that result.

What Daniel Andrews will find when he gets his briefings from the Department today is that if he tears up the East-West Link contract, he will have a $1.1 billion compensation bill and he will lose the $3 billion of federal funding.

Speech at the Small Business Association of Australia National Conference

Thank you for the opportunity to address your conference, representing the Prime Minister. Can I thank Anne Nalder and the Small Business Association of Australia for your work and advocacy on behalf of the two million small businesses nationally - The two million who generate five million jobs and who are the engine of our economy; the two million who typically mortgage their houses and often sweat over making payroll each month.

Speech at the Melbourne Institute of Technology Graduation Ceremony

Acknowledgments

Emeritus Professor John Rickard, Chair of the Board of Directors, Mr Shesh Gale, Chief Executive Officer, members of the Academic Board, faculty staff, proud parents, and graduands.

Congratulations to you, the graduands of the Melbourne Institute of Technology and class of 2014.

It is an honour to be here and address you.

I have known Mr Gale for some time and recognise his very hard work in providing the best possible higher education for MIT's students.

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